DIY Pineapple Party Decoration

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Pineapple popularity has exploded over the last few years and I have to say that I am riding the pineapple wave. And with my second son’s first birthday party coming up I thought I would satisfy my pineapple infatuation by throwing him a pineapple party!

And who doesn’t love a DIY pineapple?

I like to make as much of the party decorations as possible to save me a wad of cash. I also found these really cute, free pineapple printables like these party favor pineapples, this cute summer pineapple banner and this pineapple coloring page for the kiddies goodie bags!

The items you’ll need for your adorable pineapple…

  • Paper mache egg
  • Yellow tissue paper
  • Mod Podge
  • Scissors
  • Brown Sharpie
  • Green poster board
  • Paint brush

First, cut the fronds to the desired length that you want. I cut mine about 6 inches. I also cut mine from longer to shorter so that when I rolled it up it would have some dimension of longer and shorter fronds.

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Looks like monster teeth! Nom nom nom!

The poster board gives almost the same feel as real pineapple fronds. Then I just curled them slightly with my nail, pulling from the wider end to the smaller making the fronds look more life-like.

Then roll up the fronds, shorter ones first, and then tape together so it doesn’t uncurl. Roll the next piece, shortest to tallest, and tape to the one already rolled up.

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Then use the fronds (no, not the Fonz) and trace a circle onto the top of your pineapple. Take a knife and cut straight down into the pineapple. Push the fronds down into where you cut. It should stay secure but for extra security you can add some mod podge to the edges.

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*Warning* Knives in pictures are larger than they actually are.

diy pineapple party decor thebeamingbrunette.com

Next you are going to cut small triangles into the edge of the tissue paper. After you have cut that leave a 2 inch edge so you will be able to glue the tissue paper onto your pineapple. Now, you also have some cool triangle confetti. You’re welcome.

I cut the tissue paper into smaller sections so they would be easier to glue onto the pineapple. I glued them with the triangles pointing up because I didn’t want the hassle of making sure I didn’t bend or crumple the points when it got down to the bottom of the egg. And it makes more sense that the triangles be pointing up since a pineapple grows up and not down, right? Humor me and just nod at your screen.

You can glue the tips down if you want but I left mine unglued so that it would have a more realisitic look.

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Coming along pretty nicely. This took me only a few hours to glue all of the tissue paper on. It might be a little quicker for you if you don’t have kids. 😉

After you have all of your triangle strips glued onto the egg, take a brown sharpie marker and draw little up arrows onto the tissue paper triangles, like so…

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This turned out so well I wish there had been another egg so I could have made more! I can’t wait to work on the rest of the pineapple decorations for little D’s birthday party next month.

diy pineapple party decor thebeamingburnette.com

Care to share your pineapple projects?

DIY pineapple party decor

Easy DIY Spring Decor

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I was on Pinterest (No, not for 3 hours. Why do you ask?) looking for a way to bring something fresh to my home this spring. I came across this super easy DIY project that I couldn’t pass up. You can view the original idea here from Two Twenty-One. That girl has some great stuff!

What I love about this project is I literally did this during nap time. Quick and simple. I decided to go with washi tape because it’s cheaper and I don’t have a bunch of bright, beautiful fabric on hand.

The items you’ll need for your DIY…

  • Picture frame
  • Several different colors of washi tape
  • Scissors
  • Cross printable
  • 8×11 piece of paper

There are two different types of cross printables here and here.

Easy diy spring decor thebeamingbrunette.com

Take the little paper that comes in the frame out. This is going to be your cover.

easy diy spring decor thebeamingbrunette.com

Use your cross print out (or whichever design you choose) and trace it over the picture side of the frame insert. This is a 8×10 frame so you’ll want to measure the inside of the frame to make sure that your picture doesn’t get cut off by the sides of the frame. Mine measured 7×9 to fit inside.

It should look like this after it has been cut out.

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I did it this way so I could just peel off the cross and have the pretty washi tape as a background for something else.

Now comes the fun part!

Cross, scissors, washi tape, frame3, spring decor, diy, easter, jesus

There are so many fun colors it was hard to choose only a few. Washi tape has so many uses too! I love the idea of lining a shelf with washi tape. Or sprucing up some tea light candles for a party. And I love how if you make a mistake it comes off very easily.

Roll out the washi tape and line up the pieces as close as you can so there aren’t any gaps. Fill up the entire piece of paper. Tape your cross over the washi-ed up paper and cut off any excess to fit in your frame.

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There you have it. Pretty darn easy!

easy diy spring decor thebeamingbrunette.com

Happy decorating!

Do you like using washi tape? How do you use it?

DIY Hanging Coffee Cup Sign

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I finally took the plunge and tried my hand at chalk painting with this super chic hanging coffee cup sign.

Let me tell you it was sooooo easy!

I was super intimidated by all of the really pretty furniture I had seen done by others that I thought, “Ain’t no way mama gonna make it look that nice.” Well, I proved my self wrong and have a fantastic finished product to show for it.

I found the style of sign that I wanted at Hobby Lobby (A. K. A. my second home) and also the chalk paint I was going to use. I wasn’t sure if my piece would turn out as nice looking because the chalkpaint is on the cheaper end of the spectrum but it turned out better than I had imagined. I highly recommend the Folkart chalk paint for newbies or for smaller projects because of it price and ease of use. And if you make a mistake, you’re not out that wad of cash you spent on the more expensive kind.

I applied two coats and there is still half a bottle left. I am brainstorming as I write what other projects I could paint with it.

I painted the piece first in “Linen” by Folkart paint (not pictured). I wanted a creamy color peaking through after I distressed the piece. Let that dry and painted a second coat on top of that.

Next came the chalk paint.

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I have never used Annie Sloan chalk paint or any other professional chalk paint so I have nothing to compare it to. This chalk paint is very smooth and dries very quickly! It says it takes a couple of hours to dry between coats but mine dried much faster because I was in a nice toasty room. Applied a second coat to cover up the cream color and waited for it to dry.

Next, I used a really fine grit to sand the edges of the sign. 220 grit, to be exact.

I only sanded the edges to give it depth and dimension. It only took a few strokes to take the chalk paint off to let the cream show through.

Next came the more trickier part.

The words.

I was originally going to free hand the lettering because I have done so many times before buuuut not with paint. So I didn’t trust my hand this time because paint isn’t as forgiving as pencil or actual chalk.

I found this pretty font here and traced it onto the board. I created some guidelines so that the words would be straight. I took off part of the curl on the C because it was too difficult to trace.

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I used a white eraser so as not to leave any pink smudges on my work. I didn’t bother erasing the lines in the letters themselves because I knew the paint would cover them up.

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This part was a little more time-consuming than just slapping the paint on but the sense of accomplishment when you finish is well worth the effort, right? Like when you finish organizing your pantry…oh, just me that feels that way?

Okay, moving on.

I used the same color as the base coat and started painting my letters on it.

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The above picture is the first coat. See, the pencil lines are already covered even with just that one coat.

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And here’s the second coat.

Now comes the part I was most terrified of. The wax coat. I even left the project sitting several days because I didn’t feel up to the task. That, and my children and laundry were calling to be taken care of.

Then I just had to bite the bullet and get on with it.

Again, I haven’t tried the wax from Annie Sloan, or any other wax for that matter, but this seemed to do the trick. For those of you new to chalk painting and such, you need to wax your piece afterwards so all your hard work doesn’t get scratched off. This is what’s called “sealing” your work. If your piece is a going to be in a high traffic area you should seal it with something more heavy-duty like a polycrylic. Otherwise a soft wax should be just fine.

I went with a clear wax because I didn’t want it to have that antique look that a brown wax would give the piece. That, and I didn’t think the brown wax would look good over the grey. This Folkart wax is super runny. Very similar to Mod Podge. You need to allow the wax twenty-four hours to dry before your next coat if you want to do two. When it is dry it feels very smooth. The bottle says you can buff it with a rag and that it can be washed with soap and water, which is good to know because I want to hang this in the kitchen where food could potentially get splattered on it.

Time to add the hardware.

Lay your work on a towel (or an old t-shirt of your husband’s) so your work doesn’t get scratched and draw a long line across the back so your hanging hooks will be lined up. To keep these little babies from moving around while you hammer in the nails just put a little piece of tape across the top of it. Now you’re free to hammer away.

I put two hanging hooks on the back because I wanted it to be extra secure.

This is the hook size I used. The 1 1/4 inch measurement is the length of the hook not including the screw thread. Make sure to bring the cup you will be hanging on your board with you to the hardware store or measure the width of the coffee cup handle because the first hooks I bought were too small and I had to take them back. Your local Ace Hardware store will most likely carry these or you can get them here.

Flip your piece over and add the hooks. I spaced mine about 3 1/2 inches apart. I estimated this spacing by placing the cups in a hanging fashion next to the work to see how far apart I would need to space them so they didn’t knock into each other.

These little hooks hold up to 20 lbs! Do you hear that? That is the sound of my heart beating thinking about how much coffee a cup that big would hold!

Ahem.

Any who! These hooks are fairly easy to screw in. Just apply a small amount of pressure and twist at the same time and the hook should screw in smoothly.

And now, the piece de resistance…

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Aren’t these little espresso cups adorable? These cups are from Starbucks but I don’t think they make this kind anymore. There are very similar ones here. My son loves drinking hot chocolate out of these and pretends that he is drinking coffee like mommy and daddy. The cups only hold 3 ounces so I don’t feel bad about giving him that little of hot chocolate.

Well, there you have it folks!

What chalk paint projects have you been dying to try but have been too intimidated to start? I would love to hear from you!